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3 Box Brood Hive
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Bill from NJ



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 72
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post 3 Box Brood Hive Reply with quote
Dave,

I enjoyed viewing your videos and I am going to implement many of your teachings/stratagies.

The big issue I have is.... After checking with "many others" in my bee club and asking about the 3 box of brood. Not one person here does this.

Some only have 1 box, but never more than 2. I have been told by some "Older" more experienced members, "Don't bother", "Not much difference", etc.

Now, dispite what others have told me, I WILL follow your directions (via the video) and set up my hive inserting between (in ther middle) the other two. as per instructions.

This should grow my hive in size and in turn, increase output. Which makes absolute sense to me.


My question for you is: After using the 3 box brood hive, how would I manipulate the boxes next time around? Keep inserting a new brood box in middle?

I recall you mentioning "The Golden rule", about the Queen never crossing the honey line above, would you please elaborate on this more.


Regards,
Bill from NJ

Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:21 pm View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
susan foster hoes



Joined: 09 Jun 2007
Posts: 18
Location: Pointe au Baril, Ontario

Post three box hives Reply with quote
Hi Bill,

I don't have an answer to your manipulation question, but I, too, plan on following Dave's method of using three brood boxes per hive. I've been to two different beekeeping clubs and I also find people only keeping one and two box hives.

I just started this summer with a 5-frame nuc. It grew to two boxes by end of summer, and I will let it go to three boxes next season. It just makes sense to me. The bees will have plenty of their own food going into winter, and I would think the hive isn't as vulnerable when it is three boxes full. I don't have the experience to back this up yet, but it sounds right.

I'm hoping to start a second hive next season in the same way.

Best of luck,

Sue


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Sue Hoes, Pointe au Baril, Ontario
Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:41 pm View user's profile Send private message
beeworks
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 283
Location: Ontario, Canada

Post Re: 3 Box Brood Hive Reply with quote
Bill from NJ wrote:
My question for you is: After using the 3 box brood hive, how would I manipulate the boxes next time around? Keep inserting a new brood box in middle?
I recall you mentioning "The Golden rule", about the Queen never crossing the honey line above, would you please elaborate on this more.
Regards,
Bill from NJ


The next time around? In the second year of a 3 box hive does not entail moving boxes. The whole idea is to give the bees ample space. I will on occasion, early in the spring, interchange the two bottom boxes. Caution is needed here as you can split the brood nest which can lead to two brood areas.
This leads to the second point. The hive cannot have two brood areas. By interchanging boxes you can shift the 'honey crown' down into the bottom box. The queen cannot go over honey to lay worker eggs so she can become trapped in the lower box, slowing down the nest expansion, rather than giving them more space.


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David Eyre,
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Thu Nov 29, 2007 2:13 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Bill from NJ



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 72
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post Reply with quote
Thanks Dave, I just wanted to make sure I am on the right track here. Which you have just confirmed for me!

I have "The Golden Rule" ingrained in the back of my mind. Excellent information to know. Thank You!

I sincerely appreciate you assistance and advice on this site. It feels at times I am lost in the wilderness and all alone out here.

your videos are an excellent resource for me to learn from, really great information.


Sue,

It seems we both started at the same time and with NUC's also.
I have fed, fed, and fed some more to build up and draw the new comb off of the foundation.

I am going into the Winter with 2 hives that weigh 160lbs each. When the State bee inspector came to visit, he made a positive comment on the weight and
the possibility of an excellent hive growing for the up coming Spring. I am excited and cannot wait until Spring to get rolling again.

Next Spring season I will make up 2 more hives for a maximum of 4 hives total. This is more than ample for my little parcel of property in the busy suburban area where I live.
I hope to continue following good advice and enjoying this hobby. So far so good.

Warm Regards,
Bill from NJ

Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:35 pm View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
bviner



Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 17
Location: Massachusetts

Post Reply with quote
For what it's worth:

I started out using all "doubles".

Then, I heard about "triples" (perhaps from David, but as my wife would say "that was long ago and far away") ...and it made sense. At first, I just loved them. They usually brought stronger colonies through winter. All the extra room made Spring clean-up a breeze.

However, over time I have come to appreciate the problems. Obviously, with "triples" you have to build/maintain more boxes and frames, ...which is significant if one has a "day job". Second, if you have a good year and add supers, you end up either working them on a step ladder or doing lifts that may be hazardous to your back and bees.

Now I run some "doubles" and some "triples", ...and don't know which way I'm going.

Wed Dec 05, 2007 8:20 pm View user's profile Send private message
Bill from NJ



Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Posts: 72
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post Reply with quote
bviner,

Having only a few hives to care for, I do not mind the little extra work involved in the upkeep and maintenence.

As for a good year, I still do not expect a boom in honey production. The State inspector stated I have more concrete than green where I live.

This is an enjoyable hobby for my wife and I. We have not seen any honey bees around this area for a few years. Now we have own hives in our yard, and our little garden is producing extreamly well.

Thank you for your imput and sharing your experience with me.

Regards,
Bill from NJ

Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:53 pm View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
3gooddogs



Joined: 12 Nov 2007
Posts: 72
Location: Clarkston, Washington

Post Reply with quote
This is my second year with my hives. The big hive has three deeps (D.E. Hive) and now I have two honey supers on. I rechecked today and the top deep is FULL of honey. Second box is mostly hone with some brood. Bottom box is all brood with a bit of honey on the end frames. The honey supers are EMPTY. No queen excluder because what is the point. The top box is all honey. How do I get them to put stores in the honey supers. (most of the super frames are drawn comb). I have even gone to the point of removing sealed honey stores from the top box replacing with drawn comb to supply additional room for brood but they just filled it back with honey instead of laying in it or moving stores to the honey super. What is the problem here?
Nikki

Thu Jul 30, 2009 10:13 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
beeworks
Site Admin


Joined: 09 Feb 2007
Posts: 283
Location: Ontario, Canada

Post Reply with quote
[quote="3gooddogs" I have even gone to the point of removing sealed honey stores from the top box replacing with drawn comb to supply additional room for brood but they just filled it back with honey instead of laying in it or moving stores to the honey super. What is the problem here?
Nikki[/quote]

This is always a problem, the bees don't react the way we want them to!
Give them time, they have to fill the hive up their way, and until the bottom boxes close to the brood are full they won't make any 'surplus' for you.
If you remove sealed stores from their top box then obviously they will fill them up again.
You need to remember, if you want more brood space, then expand the brood area, any boxes above the brood will be filled with honey.


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David Eyre,
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Mon Aug 03, 2009 5:40 pm View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
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